Category Archives: Tourism

EOI Fuengirola: 25th Birthday! Any Contributions?

This year teachers and students are preparing things for our 25th Anniversary Celebration. Some people are preparing songs, videos, activities of various sorts… And this post is to mention one of them:

The Mag. Before we part in December, for the winter holidays, is the deadline to hand in contributions for a multimedia magazine we will publish towards the end of the course, to celebrate!

And, for instance, we would like to include the post here on “seseo” and “ceceo”, by Melania

I’m also collecting thoughts by students on what it’s meant for you to study a language or languages at this EOI. (And as you know, we need to turn any references to particular teachers, to a general reference to teachers, so it’s best if you sort that out yourselves! 🙂

I also wanted to tell you all that if you are interested in contributing, you can talk to your teacher — or post here, if it’s about topics that we can bring up in Loving Andalucía. For instance, misperceptions or negative generalizations on Andalucía or Spain, so we can help people learn to see reality! 😀

It would be great to have pieces by students on places worth visiting in Andalucía, for instance! You can write an article, or do a more literary piece, or you can record an audio or video!

I’m also going to write a piece on politeness in Spain, so foreigners can learn about our culture and respect it. If you have ideas for this, or things you’ve observed, please, let me know. The piece could be cooperative writing! 🙂

Why do Spanish people have “tapas”?

Spanish people have “tapas” out of a belief that drinking alcohol without having something to eat is not a good idea. Tapas relate to having drinks and chatting.

Tapas go from a saucer of olives or chips to the most elaborate mini-meals! And they are free. It’s a kindness by the owners of the establishment.

Tapeo means going out for drinks and tapas, and also having tapas instead of a regular meal.

In Autumn, in Fuengirola, bars and restaurants celebrate the Erotic Tapa Tour. For two euros you can get a beer and a tapa. This is fun, delicious and helps locals get by after the summer season.

More reading, in Spanish:

More questions on being loud (Protest)

Aren’t people in Britain loud when they get together? We all know about how loud people in British pubs are — whether we’ve been to Britain or to a British pub in Spain. Many are also loud when they are on holidays abroad. Locals know a lot about this.

So what’s the problem when local people are loud in bars in Spain? Perhaps it’s rare (not very frequent), because locals are mostly not having drinks with friends, but working, in places where tourism is the source of income. Could it be because they laugh more or louder?

Why do business people exert such tolerance when foreigners are loud and feel free to mimick foreigners’ disgust when locals are loud? The answer is rather sad.

Beyond stereotypes, it seems that groups of friends are loud in many different cultures.

It’s OK one does not like loud people, but it’s not OK to notice other people are loud when you do the same thing.